Sexuality and Disability

All people, including people living with a disability, must be guaranteed their sexual health and rights. Depending on the disability, sex may require more innovation, patience and planning. It is important for all people, including people with disabilities, to listen to their bodies and to talk with their partner and health provider.

Get Your Copy of Beyond the Basics Today!

Beyond the Basics is a resource for educators that offers the tools to teach young people about sexuality and sexual health from a sex positive, human rights perspective. Covering topics that range from anatomy to consent and healthy relationships, Beyond the Basics approaches sexuality education across all gender identities and sexual orientations with activities that help move students from receiving information to making decisions based on critical thinking skills and empowerment. Recognizing the time pressures educators face, Beyond the Basics is written to easily move in and out of chapters, modules, and activities that suit the particular age, maturity, and trust in each classroom.

Click here to purchase today!

You’re invited! Sex-Ed Beyond the Basics Launch Party!

It’s back to school time, let’s talk about Sex…ED!

Come celebrate the launch of Beyond the Basics and join us in speaking up for quality sex-ed!

It’s been a labour of love, working with sexual health experts from across the country to develop Beyond the Basics, a sex-ed resource that addresses the gaps we keep hearing about! From consent to LGBTQ+ inclusive sex-ed, join the conversation to help bring comprehensive sex-ed into classrooms across Canada!

What? Where? When?

Launch Party: Sex-Ed Beyond the Basics
Thursday September 28th
7:00PM – 10:00PM
Gladstone Hotel
1214 Queen Street West, Toronto

Click here to register for your free ticket!

What can you expect?

A night of toasts, interactive booths, audience Q&A, and small bites on us! (cash bar)

Who will be toasting the event?

Nadine Thornhill, Ed.D – Sexuality Educator
Karen B. K. Chan, Sexuality Educator
Kaleigh Trace, Author
Dr. Danielle Martin, Family Doctor and national media commentator
Sandeep Prasad, ED Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights

Can’t make the event?

Click here to receive notifications about Beyond the Basics!

What’s Beyond the Basics?

Beyond the Basics is a resource for educators that offers the tools to teach young people about sexuality and sexual health from a sex positive, human rights perspective. Covering topics that range from anatomy to consent and healthy relationships, Beyond the Basics approaches sexuality education across all gender identities and sexual orientations with activities that help move students from receiving information to making decisions based on critical thinking skills and empowerment. Recognizing the time pressures educators face, Beyond the Basics is written to easily move in and out of chapters, modules, and activities that suit the particular age, maturity, and trust in each classroom.

Action Canada Submission to Canada’s Consultation on Federal Accessibility Legislation

The report was submitted by Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights as part of the consultation on Canada’s federal accessibility legislation. It examines and makes specific recommendations related to sexual abuse, forced sterilization, the right to health, specifically sexual and reproductive health, and the right to education, specifically inclusive comprehensive sexuality education, for people with disabilities.

Click here to read the report

Submission to Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Advance of Canada’s Review

The report was submitted by Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights for Canada’s review during the 17th session of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (20 March – 17 April 2017).

The report examines violations of Articles 16, 17, 24 and 25 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities with respect to sexual abuse, forced sterilization, the right to health, specifically sexual and reproductive health, and the right to education, specifically inclusive comprehensive sexuality education.

Click here to read the report

SRH2017: That’s a wrap!

Last week was Sexual and Reproductive Health Awareness Week with the theme Ready for some pillow talk? Did you miss it? There are still ways you can get involved.

Click here to learn more!

Have questions about your sexual and reproductive health?

The information hub on sexual and reproductive health offers helpful explanations,  health tips and suggestions on a range of topics related to sexual and reproductive health, including the body, healthy relationships, navigating consent, pregnancy options and sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, to name a few.

Count me IN!: Research report on violence against disabled, lesbian, and sex-working women in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal

Originally published in RHM Journal
By Creating Resources for Empowerment in Action (CREA), New Delhi, India, 2012

Despite many achievements of the women’s movements and significant strides towards gender equality and women’s empowerment in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal, violence has systemically been used by State and non-State actors to exclude marginalised women from participating as rights-bearing citizens in the public and private spheres. Research on violence against women remains inadequate if it does not take into account the causes and consequences of violence when gender identities intersect with other identities based on sexuality, disability, or occupation among women pushed to the margins of society, including in our collective imagination. This study investigated the hypothesis that women who are outside the mainstream of South Asian society, including lesbians, sex-working women and women with a physical or mental disability, suffer higher rates of violence and are often unable to seek and receive protection from State agencies. The study had three main objectives: to quantify levels of violence suffered by marginalised women in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal and catalogue their experiences of violence; to review levels of service provision available for them; and to analyse the extent of political support (or opposition) for addressing violence against marginalised women.

A global literature review of peer-reviewed research focusing on violence against disabled women, lesbian women, and sex-working women revealed that the overwhelming majority of research had been conducted in North America. Only one of the studies identified was undertaken among sex-working women in Dhaka, Bangladesh, highlighting the gaps in the evidence from South Asia. This report is a first step towards filling in some of these gaps by looking at the intersection of marginalisation, gender, and violence against women in South Asia.

Click here to read the report